Rigging, pt. 3

Hello!

Autumn is approaching and so is the deadline of our occupation of the building space we have been stationed in for 3 years. So there is now an outside pressure to getting the boat to water soon. I finished constructing the boom gooseneck. To my surprise, I could pull 4,8 mm stainless rivets by hand with my Stanley rivet gun, albeit palms received pain. Roughly 2/5 of the boat has been painted with an oil based enamel, white, called Pentaprim. Stinks well and a respirator is needed. I used a larger 10 cmm wide brush to apply the paint. Leaves a good cover. I wont go for a second layer. Right, the sails are in the making and after painting the inside, rest of the rigging can be fastened. Also, the companionway is finished. Pictures:

 

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Rigging, pt. 2

Hello!

Today I discovered that it is relatively easy to sharpen drill bits – you need a bench grinder and a 118 deg guide. It took 15 minutes of practice to get a working bit. This means I could finish the mast step and the rudder hinge. HSS bits are no good for stainless and harder steels of its kind, they simply wear down and are heat sensitive. They say that the next best is HSS-Co (Cobalt). I ended up sharpening all my drill bits. Don’t need to buy one for a long time now. So, the mast step is finished, so are the rudder hindges.

I spent about half a day sanding the nooks and crannies of the boat interior. Another half day session is needed to get the sharp points off. I’m not going for a luster, just so that the surface does not look like the Himalayas. It is a Dremel paradise. I’ll make a video.

Then there is the work on the rudder tiller, which is underway, and also painting of the hatch – now painted. Waiting for some funds to get interior paint and oak varnish. That’ll be next weeks topic. Meanwhile thinking of boom-mast connection. A dry ft is in order by the end of next week.

Cheers!

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Rigging, pt. 1

Hello!

Our Fafnir is going to have a bermuda rig with an ice-boat mast. This means that the boom will rotate with the mast. It is a first approach and will be built so that it can be changed later. To get the boat on water, rigging plus a few little details have to be completed. We have a mast, a boom, a jib and mainsail (being refitted to our measurements) and are now working on getting their minions, bracing plates, U-fastenings and the like in place, lots of ANSI 316 to cut. Lets have the pictures:

Cheers!

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